January 11, 2012
latimes:

Much has changed for gay and lesbian Catholics in L.A.:  A Mass in Hollywood celebrates the 25th anniversary of the gay and lesbian ministry established by then-Archbishop Roger Mahony. Despite a larger acceptance, participants know that challenges remain.
Photo:   Luis Manuel Torres, left, Nick Rocca, Doug Anderson, Frank Galvan and Renee Stampolis were among those who attended a Mass at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood celebrating the 25th anniversary of the founding of a ministry for gay and lesbian Catholics. Credit: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

Much has changed for gay and lesbian Catholics in L.A.: A Mass in Hollywood celebrates the 25th anniversary of the gay and lesbian ministry established by then-Archbishop Roger Mahony. Despite a larger acceptance, participants know that challenges remain.

Photo: Luis Manuel Torres, left, Nick Rocca, Doug Anderson, Frank Galvan and Renee Stampolis were among those who attended a Mass at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood celebrating the 25th anniversary of the founding of a ministry for gay and lesbian Catholics. Credit: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

Nov. 2, 1976: Nuns from the Little Sisters of the Poor vote early in the morning at an East 1st Street polling place during heavy turnout in the presidential election pitting Republican incumbent Gerald Ford against Democratic challenger Jimmy Carter. The sisters ran a home for the elderly next to the polling place.
Photo credit: Steve Fontanini / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

Nov. 2, 1976: Nuns from the Little Sisters of the Poor vote early in the morning at an East 1st Street polling place during heavy turnout in the presidential election pitting Republican incumbent Gerald Ford against Democratic challenger Jimmy Carter. The sisters ran a home for the elderly next to the polling place.

Photo credit: Steve Fontanini / Los Angeles Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

Universal flu vaccine may be on horizon: Two drug companies are testing formulations of universal flu vaccine in hopes of bringing a successful version to market in the coming years. Such a shot may work for several years, possibly replacing the annual flu shot.
Photo credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

Universal flu vaccine may be on horizon: Two drug companies are testing formulations of universal flu vaccine in hopes of bringing a successful version to market in the coming years. Such a shot may work for several years, possibly replacing the annual flu shot.

Photo credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

Personal stories warm up Seoul’s subway rides: In South Korea, placards on trains offer short tales of love, loss and coping with everyday life for harried commuters. “The storytelling program began last year as an antidote to the drudgery of Seoul’s daily commute in packed subway cars that hurtle along, funeral-home silent, on one of the planet’s most heavily used rapid transit systems,” John M. Glionna writes.
Some of the stories:

A man tells of his boyhood shame at learning from a friend that the sneakers his mother gave him were the castoffs of another child. A woman realizes her selfishness after years of complaining how she had to care for an Alzheimer’s-ridden mother-in-law — guided by her own son’s devotion to his ailing grandmother.

Photo:  A Seoul subway rider looks up at a placard bearing one of the personal stories submitted by everyday commuters. Credit: Matt Douma / For The Times

latimes:

Personal stories warm up Seoul’s subway rides: In South Korea, placards on trains offer short tales of love, loss and coping with everyday life for harried commuters. “The storytelling program began last year as an antidote to the drudgery of Seoul’s daily commute in packed subway cars that hurtle along, funeral-home silent, on one of the planet’s most heavily used rapid transit systems,” John M. Glionna writes.

Some of the stories:

A man tells of his boyhood shame at learning from a friend that the sneakers his mother gave him were the castoffs of another child. A woman realizes her selfishness after years of complaining how she had to care for an Alzheimer’s-ridden mother-in-law — guided by her own son’s devotion to his ailing grandmother.

Photo: A Seoul subway rider looks up at a placard bearing one of the personal stories submitted by everyday commuters. Credit: Matt Douma / For The Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

Is family-friendly TV going extinct? The new fall season highlights how scripted TV shows with a broad family appeal have become a rarity, with “Terra Nova” and “The Middle” among the few.
This is fascinating:

Also, the family unit itself has markedly changed since the mid-1970s, when the Federal Communications Commission pressured the top three networks to institute a “family viewing hour” from 8 to 9 p.m. Over the last four decades — as divorce and single parenthood climbed sharply — the percentage of children younger than 18 living in a two-parent household slid from roughly 85% to 67%, according to statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau. Meanwhile, the family viewing hour policy, born from protests about the rising tide of sex and violence on TV in the early 1970s, was scrapped by the courts within a couple of years, leaving the networks to pledge their best effort in maintaining suitable family programming in that prime-time hour.

Photo:  A family watching a television program in which an elephant performs tricks circa 1955. Credit: Harold Lambert / Getty Images

latimes:

Is family-friendly TV going extinct? The new fall season highlights how scripted TV shows with a broad family appeal have become a rarity, with “Terra Nova” and “The Middle” among the few.

This is fascinating:

Also, the family unit itself has markedly changed since the mid-1970s, when the Federal Communications Commission pressured the top three networks to institute a “family viewing hour” from 8 to 9 p.m. Over the last four decades — as divorce and single parenthood climbed sharply — the percentage of children younger than 18 living in a two-parent household slid from roughly 85% to 67%, according to statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau. Meanwhile, the family viewing hour policy, born from protests about the rising tide of sex and violence on TV in the early 1970s, was scrapped by the courts within a couple of years, leaving the networks to pledge their best effort in maintaining suitable family programming in that prime-time hour.

Photo: A family watching a television program in which an elephant performs tricks circa 1955. Credit: Harold Lambert / Getty Images

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

The high price of the California bullet train: Its proposed route would destroy churches, schools, homes, warehouses, banks, medical offices, stores and much more.

Whether the Central Valley can force significant changes in the bullet train plan is unclear. Up and down the valley, people know they are not playing with a strong political hand.
“Some people will say they screwed a bunch of farmers in Kings County. So who cares?” said Frank Oliveira, a farmer. “The answer is they will screw you too when it comes to your neighborhood.”

Photo:   Fernando Salazar, 17, a junior at Bakersfield High School, makes a box in the wood-working shop at Bakersfield High School. A proposed high-speed rail route would require closure of the school’s industrial arts building. Credit: Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

The high price of the California bullet train: Its proposed route would destroy churches, schools, homes, warehouses, banks, medical offices, stores and much more.

Whether the Central Valley can force significant changes in the bullet train plan is unclear. Up and down the valley, people know they are not playing with a strong political hand.

“Some people will say they screwed a bunch of farmers in Kings County. So who cares?” said Frank Oliveira, a farmer. “The answer is they will screw you too when it comes to your neighborhood.”

Photo: Fernando Salazar, 17, a junior at Bakersfield High School, makes a box in the wood-working shop at Bakersfield High School. A proposed high-speed rail route would require closure of the school’s industrial arts building. Credit: Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

Photo album provides a new picture of Wyatt Earp: Two brothers find evidence of the personal life of the legendary lawman. He wasn’t always a tough guy.
Fun read if you were really into HBO’s “Deadwood.”
Photo:   Keith Collins, left, and his brother Brian display photographs of Wyatt Earp as a boy and as a man. They were among many others in a photo album the brothers discovered in an antique store in Hesperia. Credit: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

Photo album provides a new picture of Wyatt Earp: Two brothers find evidence of the personal life of the legendary lawman. He wasn’t always a tough guy.

Fun read if you were really into HBO’s “Deadwood.”

Photo: Keith Collins, left, and his brother Brian display photographs of Wyatt Earp as a boy and as a man. They were among many others in a photo album the brothers discovered in an antique store in Hesperia. Credit: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

Finding forgiveness on death row:  A Texas man out for revenge after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks kills two men and partially blinds another with a shot to the face. The survivor, a Muslim man from Bangladesh, and the convicted killer come to terms with each other.

After all the commemorations on the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11, there is a story left to tell. The events involving Stroman and Bhuiyan happened far from the scene of the attacks, but stemmed directly from them. Their story is a counterpoint to much of the narrative of the last decade, but is nevertheless central to it. It is a story about terror and revenge. But it is also about forgiveness.

Photo: Mark Stroman sits in a visitation cell in a Texas prison in 2002. He went on a shooting rampage in 2001 to seek revenge after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. He would tell his victims: “God bless America.” Credit: Brett Coomer / For The Times

latimes:

Finding forgiveness on death row: A Texas man out for revenge after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks kills two men and partially blinds another with a shot to the face. The survivor, a Muslim man from Bangladesh, and the convicted killer come to terms with each other.

After all the commemorations on the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11, there is a story left to tell. The events involving Stroman and Bhuiyan happened far from the scene of the attacks, but stemmed directly from them. Their story is a counterpoint to much of the narrative of the last decade, but is nevertheless central to it. It is a story about terror and revenge. But it is also about forgiveness.

Photo: Mark Stroman sits in a visitation cell in a Texas prison in 2002. He went on a shooting rampage in 2001 to seek revenge after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. He would tell his victims: “God bless America.” Credit: Brett Coomer / For The Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

Hard work, devotion to one another propel triplets to success: The work ethic was instilled early in the triplets, who helped their father at his Pasadena barbershop. And they had strong community support, Hector Tobar writes. This fall they all set off for prominent colleges.
Photo:   Nicole, Aubrey and Charles Walker, from left, at a high school graduation in Pasadena in June.

latimes:

Hard work, devotion to one another propel triplets to success: The work ethic was instilled early in the triplets, who helped their father at his Pasadena barbershop. And they had strong community support, Hector Tobar writes. This fall they all set off for prominent colleges.

Photo: Nicole, Aubrey and Charles Walker, from left, at a high school graduation in Pasadena in June.

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

January 11, 2012
latimes:

L.A.-area Tunisians vote in first national elections since ruler’s ouster: Tunisia’s landmark election for a constituent assembly that will write a new constitution takes place Sunday, but balloting is being held at voting centers outside the country, including in L.A. 
Photo: Poll station volunteer Fakhreddine Essraoulia  looks on as Leila Oualha of San Diego smiles after dipping her finger in blue dye before casting her ballot at the Hollywood Heights Hotel. The blue ink is meant to prevent repeat voters. Credit: Genaro Molin / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

L.A.-area Tunisians vote in first national elections since ruler’s ouster: Tunisia’s landmark election for a constituent assembly that will write a new constitution takes place Sunday, but balloting is being held at voting centers outside the country, including in L.A.

Photo: Poll station volunteer Fakhreddine Essraoulia  looks on as Leila Oualha of San Diego smiles after dipping her finger in blue dye before casting her ballot at the Hollywood Heights Hotel. The blue ink is meant to prevent repeat voters. Credit: Genaro Molin / Los Angeles Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

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